Spring is celebrated as the beginning of the life cycle. It’s a fresh start – a time of renewal and growth. This season gives us a boost in energy to create exciting plans, begin new projects, and make new connections.

Traditional Chinese Medicine

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, each season correlates to an element and has a dominant organ, colour, emotion, taste, and sense connected to it. Spring is associated with the wood element and an inherent sense of growth and renewal. The dominant organs are the liver and gallbladder, the colour is green, the taste is sour, and the dominant sense is vision.

Throughout the year, there is both change and continuity as we move from one season to the next. Every season is interconnected, and how you nourish and care for your body in one will impact how it feels in the next. Just as winter’s water element helps spring’s wood element to grow, the strong wood of spring is needed to feed the fire element in summer.

Last year, seasonal living teacher Gemma David shared a useful guide to supporting ourselves in spring.  You’ll also find a Wellbeing Toolkit for the season here.

Our focus this spring is on gentle cleansing, planning, and connecting, so we can move forward with a sense of purpose, confidence, and energy.

Cleansing

The body naturally wants to cleanse itself in the springtime. By eating nourishing, seasonal foods that support your body, it will do this gently at the right time. This is much better than pushing and forcing change with diets and detoxes. Remember, your body is always working for you, and you can support the process by caring for your liver.

The liver is responsible for removing unwanted toxins from the body and is supported with the nutrition found in new green leaves and shoots and with foods with sour flavours.

As the environment around you begins to burst with new life, allow your body to enjoy that same energy by incorporating the following vibrant foods into your diet:

  • Fresh leafy greens
  • Baby root veggies
  • Fermented foods with their own microcosm of friendly bacteria
  • Newly sprouted seeds and beans

You can find our guide to growing your own sprouted beans along with some suggestions for simple spring dishes here.

Connecting

After a winter of rest and reflection, spring is a good time to branch out and connect with yourself, your loved ones, the community and the environment.

A good place to start is connecting with and exploring your core values. This process can help kick-start, inspire, and guide future planning. Last week’s blog post includes a list of values you can download and print along with some simple techniques to guide you.

Spring cleaning helps you connect to your home and your environment which can have a huge impact on your sense of wellbeing.

Spaces can be transformed to support and nourish us. De-cluttering unwanted and unused belongings, or simply cleaning a room and adding fresh flowers, can change the atmosphere completely, helping us move from feeling stuck and overwhelmed to feeling light and inspired.

I’ve discovered the less cluttered it is, the more considered my choices are about what I buy and bring into our home. By prioritising our wellbeing in this way, we positively impact the environment too. I buy less now and choose items that will last longer. It requires more time initially to source seasonal produce or research eco-friendly, sustainable items, but the long-term savings, both for your bank account and the environment, are worth it.

For more inspiration check out the following blog posts:

Planning

Spring is the season of new ideas, change, and hope. The energy is available to help us plan and design all areas of our lives.

The wood element is connected to planning, structure, growth, and connection. A healthy, well-established tree contains these qualities. When we have a balanced wood element, we are well rooted in the past, stand tall in the present and have a vision for the future. We also have the desire to grow and have the resilience to adapt and be flexible if needed.

Vision is the sense connected to the wood element. Creating space to plan and connect with your vision for the future helps cultivate a sense of direction and purpose, adding to our present sense of wellbeing. When we’re able to look ahead and create realistic plans, we feel confident and optimistic.

Supporting the organs associated with spring is key to strengthening the wood element. The liver is the planner and the gallbladder the decision maker. Their relationship is similar to an architect and site foreman on a building site – one makes the plans while the other transforms them into reality by being decisive and acting with good judgement.

All life needs certain conditions in order to grow and thrive, and it’s the same for us in terms of our home environment and routine.

For more inspiration, check out the following blog posts:

Spring Home Retreat

Our Spring Home Retreat is now available. You can read all about what’s included here. The retreat gives you the opportunity to focus on all aspects of your wellbeing. We’ve updated and refreshed the content and included a powerful new process designed to help you set positive intentions and explore strategies for letting go of any negative habits.

You’ll also learn how to create a sustainable wellbeing routine that aligns with your values. You’ll receive a printable planner to help you plan effectively, stay inspired, and keep you on track, plus ongoing inspiration, guidance, and support from our team of wellbeing experts.

Love Lizzie and the SOL team x

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